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  1. Yesterday
  2. MSK Production Islamabad Airport Package Announced By: Sam Clark April 19, 2019 Pakistani developer MSK Production has recently seen a revival in public activity, with news appearing today of a new airport pack including both of Islamabad's airports - the now closed Benazir Bhutto International Airport (OPRN) and the much newer Islamabad International Airport (OPIS), opened in May 2018. Over the course of a few posts on the MSK Production Facebook page, the developer outlines plans to develop both airports to be released in one package. The newer airport, OPIS, will be scratch built for Laminar's sim, with OPRN being converted from the Prepar3D/FSX version released in 2016. You can find more from MSK Production over on their Facebook page. SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK : MSK Production Islamabad Airport Package Announced | Threshold WWW.THRESHOLDX.NET Pakistani developer MSK Production has recently seen a revival in public activity, with news appearing today of a new airport pack including both of Islamabad's airports. | Threshold: Question the Answers.
  3. First TrueEarth USA Sneak Peek! ✈ Our cutting edge TrueEarth technology is coming to the land of the free! TrueEarth USA Washington This sneak peek really shows off the diversity of this amazing new region. Make sure to join our forums and keep an eye on our Facebook and Twitter pages for the fully detailed announcement coming up next week! 100% PBR Airport Coming Soon! Last week, JV teased the above images which have come from an upcoming airport project for X-Plane 11 and Prepar3D v4. We are working in tandem with the Turbulent team in order to bring you this new tech, and new workflows mean that we can release the P3D and XP versions very close together if not at the same time! This airport is our first to be built using 100% compliance to the correct PBR standards for all materials. If you look at the shots, you can see that the detail isn't just on the ground services equipment but also on the apron on which they sit. The incredible level of detail on the baggage lifter does not mean it is an FPS hog. The original model was made up of over 24 million polygons and that model was used to create the PBR map for a lower poly target. This means you get an amazingly detailed airport without the high-poly penalty.  Likewise, with the entire airport being PBR, the apron reflects light based on each material used such as asphalt, paint, metal grates and puddles etc. The lighting changes depending on the time of day, level of cloud cover, rain etc. Just don't ask us which airport it is, because we're not confirming anything yet! READ THE FULL FORUM POST HERE Copyright © 2018 Orbx Simulation Systems Pty Ltd, All rights reserved. Orbx Simulation Systems, PO Box 312 Toowong, Queensland 4066 Australia unsubscribe from this list update subscription preferences ReplyForward SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK :
  4. Frooglepete aka Froogle has started streaming on twitch again. anounced to do it 3 times a week with fridays as a fixed sheduled appearance SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK :
  5. Last week
  6. The RV-8 is an existing aircraft well into development by AOA Simulations. Our last coverage was two weeks ago, which showed many previews and product information. Today however, sees the developer implementing the tricycle variant of the aircraft, the RV-8A. It was accompanied by a single render and posted on Facebook: ‘:m: The developer asked its customers just yesterday if they would like to model it. All liveries for the tail dragger variant will work with the conventional setup - the developer has posted many screenshots of the liveries included on their Facebook page. In another Facebook post, AOA Simulations summarised their progress on Sunday: For many more previews of the liveries to be included, check AOA Simulations' Facebook page here. SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK : AOA Simulations Developing Tricycle Variant of RV-8 | Threshold WWW.THRESHOLDX.NET AOA Simulations' have announced the RV-8A, in addition to the RV-8 already in development. The main difference between the two variants is the wheel configuration. | Threshold: Question the Answers.
  7. The popular electronic flight bag addon for ESP-platforms by Aivlasoft has now been made available for X-Plane users. This follows an announcement by the developers in late February regarding compatibility with Laminar's sim. The EFB is Aivlasoft's flagship product and combines with either Navigraph Charts or Aerosoft NavDataPro to give users the full flight navigation experience. Also featured are detailed interactive ground charts and live weather displays (when fed data by Active Sky, FSGRW etc). To install Aivlasoft EFB for X-Plane, check out this page on their website and try the demo version, which allows for a 29 day fully-functional free trial. Beware of a few limitations the EFB has on the X-Plane platform - for example, the taxi chart feature is unavailable in the X-Plane version. See the full list of limitations here. Alternatively, you can purchase the EFB here for CHF 59.90 (Swiss Francs), which roughly equates to $59.00 USD. See our previous article for more information on Aivlasoft EFB for X-Plane. SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK : Aivlasoft EFB v2.0 Now Available for X-Plane | Threshold WWW.THRESHOLDX.NET The popular electronic flight bag addon for ESP-platforms by Aivlasoft has now been made available for X-Plane users, following the announcement back in February. | Threshold: Question the Answers.
  8. Frank Dainese & Fabio Bellini's latest region-based scenery, Eiger Park 3D, is nearing release. The project was debuted towards the end of March and has seen a few progress updates since, however firm details about release had yet to be made available. In a post on his blog, Frank gives us all status update on beta testing from the mountain high in the Swiss Alps: "The tests of the "EIGER 3D park" scenario started a few days ago. I still foresee until the end of April, then the corrections and changes. Expected date release: May 18 Saturday, 2019" ‍ Frank also included some new shots of the scenery in his post. You can learn more about Frank & Fabio's latest scenery, Cerro Tore/Fitz Roy, in a previous article. SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK : Frank Dainese/Fabio Bellini Eiger Park 3D Release Date Announced | Threshold WWW.THRESHOLDX.NET Frank Dainese & Fabio Bellini's latest region-based scenery, Eiger Park 3D, is nearing release. The project, announced in March, is due to release on the 18th of May. | Threshold: Question the Answers.
  9. ShortFinal Design has published more screenshots of Global. In the latest Facebook post, the developer stated: "A closer look at some of the new terrain textures for SFD Global. Since there's been some confusion, I want to clarify that the terrain textures are independent of the autogen and work globally. They are not limited to individual regions." The screenshots attached to the post are all below. The latest updates can be found together on ShortFinal Design's Facebook page. With this in mind, you may consider checking out some earlier coverage of the product: our exclusive announcement of the scenery, and autogen previews from around the world. SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK : SFD Global: Close-Ups of Terrain Textures | Threshold WWW.THRESHOLDX.NET More previews have emerged from ShortFinal Design's upcoming Global scenery for X-Plane 11. It was also clarified that terrain textures are independent of autogen. | Threshold: Question the Answers.
  10. It's that time of year again! All throughout this week, developers and stores alike have been putting up sales and deals on their X-Plane products. Here's your ultimate resource for helping your wallet lose a bit of weight post-holiday season 2018. We'll keep this list updated throughout the weekend, so check back for further deals later! Developers are listed in alphabetical order - Prices in USD unless otherwise specified. [Edit 1, 2042z]: Added Skyline Simulations & RealityXP sales. Drzewiecki Design As ever, Polish brand Drzewiecki Design have a sale running on their range of scenery products over the Easter weekend. All of their individual airports, VFR city packs, and airport packs are available for 30% off. You can make the most of this deal either on simMarket or the X-Plane.org store. Flight Factor Russian aircraft tycoons Flight Factor have discounted their popular 767 addon this Easter, with the Extended pack down $20 to $72USD and the base addon with the -300ER variant, rather confusingly only discounted by 20%, leading to a $14.40USD saving. You can grab the plane for yourself on the X-Plane.org store here. More great deals in the article! SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK : Community: X-Plane Sales Rundown - Easter 2019 | Threshold WWW.THRESHOLDX.NET It's that time of year again! The X-Plane sales have been coming in hard and fast, so here's your ultimate resource for helping your wallet lose a bit of weight this Easter. | Threshold: Question the Answers
  11. I'd imagine that the boys are just a bit busy doing other things at the moment, or maybe Edson has regained fulltime employment, which would be great news.
  12. ShortFinal Design has published more screenshots of Global. In the latest Facebook post, the developer stated: "A closer look at some of the new terrain textures for SFD Global. Since there's been some confusion, I want to clarify that the terrain textures are independent of the autogen and work globally. They are not limited to individual regions." The screenshots attached to the post are all below. The latest updates can be found together on ShortFinal Design's Facebook page. With this in mind, you may consider checking out some earlier coverage of the product: our exclusive announcement of the scenery, and autogen previews from around the world. SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK : SFD Global: Close-Ups of Terrain Textures | Threshold WWW.THRESHOLDX.NET More previews have emerged from ShortFinal Design's upcoming Global scenery for X-Plane 11. It was also clarified that terrain textures are independent of autogen. | Threshold: Question the Answers.
  13. That's all fine and dandy, but what about the promised well over a year ago Tenerife North? From the simmarket page: VOL. 1 of the scenery includes all the island with photoscenery and custom high definition mesh. However it comes without detailed GCXO North airport (only afcad + simple buildings ini vol.1). Detailed North airport will be included in product VOL. 2 to be released in 2018. So now we get VERSION 2 of VOLUME 1 before VERSION 1 of VOLUME 2....
  14. This Airbus A380 of Lufthansa overtook a Boeing 747 of the same company while lifting up for another long haul flight. If you like big and heavy airplanes Frankfurt is the place to be. Within four hours I was able to film 100 heavies last wednesday and it never gets boring at this amazing airport. The Lufthansa Boeing 747 just landed on ruwnay 07R and was on its way to the parking position while its company A380 departed on runway 07C. What a sight to see both competitors in one frame. I love Frankfurt for these kind of video opportunities. You always get amazing motives! I also filmed my first Boeing 787-10 of United which is the second clip in this aviation compilation and the Boeing 787-8 of American was a lovely sight aswell. Thanks for watching, new videos every tuesday and friday.SOURCE
  15. We are pleased to announce that MK-Studios will be updating their original Tenerife South airport to version 2 within the next week. Version 2 isn’t just a minor update – it is completely new with a huge set of features all of which have been improved upon from the first release. If you’re an existing customer, this update will be offered to you free of chargewhen it is released. The number of changes between version 1 and version 2 is pretty significant. One of the biggest changes is the introduction of brand new satellite imagery for the whole island. The new version features 25cm/ pixel resolution at the airport area, with 50cm/ pixel for everything else. This means that the island can be explored in much great detail than before. In addition, PBR texturing will be included for all taxiways and runways and also the 3D volumetric grass. Other changes include the new terminal construction, improved dynamic lighting, 3D people and denser autogen and custom objects near the airport for improved immersion. If you’re new to the MK-Studios Tenerife product, then you may be interested in hearing that the product comes with other features as well. Tenerife South from MK-Studios features thousands of custom built objects around the island, a customer AFCAD for accurate operations at the airport and detailed modelling and texturing of the airport as it is today. Furthermore, the airport is fully compatible with SODE and GSX, including the VGDS docking system. As mentioned, the new update will be free of charge for existing owners of Tenerife South from MK-Studios. The old version is currently not available to purchase as of right now whilst the stores bring the new version online. Once version 2 is released we will let you know. In terms of other MK-Studios projects, we can also tell you that once Tenerife South V2 is released, Tenerife North will come shortly afterwards. Sadly, at this time, we have no information on Dublin to share at this time. Change log from version 1 to version 2 New ground polygons with up to date layout and stands PBR ground and wet effects New runway lights Added runway exit lights Added new terminal construction Updated terminal to support PBR glass Updated terminal textures Added construction area near runway 07 New 3D people added in the terminal and on the apron Updated airport vehicle parking with baggage belt under the main terminal New dynamic lights with improved range and performance New 3D grass New sattelite imaginary with 25 cm / pixel resolution in the airport area, and 50 cm/ pixel for the whole island Small mesh adjustments New and more dense autogen in the airport area and some island parts Added new fans and lighthouse Added red nav to lamps and objects Slight adjustments to Playa de Las Teresitas P3D V4.5+ compatible Feature List of Tenerife V2 Fully detailed rendition of Tenerife South airport and island with up to date state, Updated ground layout and stands according to real world changes, 25cm/pixel sattelite resolotion for the airport area (!), 45cm/pixel sattelite resolution for the whole island (!), 5 m/pixel mesh resolution for the whole island (!), Accurate and detailed airport infrastructure based on real sizes and dimensions, Detailed AFCAD adjusted for AI addons with custom approaches and navaids, Many monuments and custom objects around the island, PBR implementation for taxiways and runways, PBR implementation of terminal glass, Thousands of custom placed autogen buildings all around the island, Very realistic night lighting with directional taxiway centerline lights, runway speedway exit lights, approach lights including correct brightness and visibility conditions (day, night, weather,), Optimized Dynamic Lightning, Realistic shadow rendition on all 3D objects and on the ground, Compatible to all major traffic add-ons, SODE jetways and windsocks supported, Advanced, fully working VGDS docking system for GSX users! Vector data addons comaptibility, Optimized to take advantages of new P3D V4 features. SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK : FSElite Exclusive: MK-Studios Announces Tenerife South V2 | FSElite FSELITE.NET We are pleased to announce that MK-Studios will be updating their original Tenerife South airport to version 2 within the next week. Version 2 isn’t just a minor update – it is completely new with a huge set of features all of which have been improved upon from the first release. If you’re an existing […]
  16. Hi Team Is On Approach dead? SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK :
  17. tried link got-404 - Page could not be found searched around found here- Global Earth STORE.X-PLANE.ORG for Your Price:$45.00
  18. Developer's diary - Traffic Global for X-Plane 11 by Jim Keir (Developer) Hello! Welcome to the dev diary for Traffic Global for X-Plane – TGXP to friends. I’m going to be talking about how this came about, what it does, what it doesn’t do, why, and quite a lot of what goes into making it work. There’s going to be a certain amount of techy background detail – hey, it’s a dev diary – but I want this to be open to anyone with a little interest in what goes into making your sim a nicer place to be.January / February / MarchDev Diary for Traffic Global XP – March Welcome back! After dealing with providing aircraft models and the actual traffic database – at least partly – last month, it’s time to take a step back and look at some of the design choices that were made, and why. The big question of course is “what are we trying to achieve?”. Well… traffic. In the sim. Speaking as a real-life (if very occasional) pilot who flies near London I’d love nothing more than to remove a great deal of traffic! However, there’s no question that in-sim there are far fewer other aircraft around and if you’re going for “as real as it gets”, that’s a problem. So, once again, what are we aiming for? You might say “as real as it gets but c’mon guys it’s a simulator”. I was reading a forum thread the other night about a completely different traffic product which had a long sequence of posts along the lines of “… yeah, but my local airport, Hicksville Muni, added three parking spots on the grass last week and does this product that was released 18 months ago use them? Does it heck. What a waste of money.”Sim Heathrow - not quite the same as the real Heathrow One of the earliest design choices to be made was how dynamic the traffic would be. In other words, it would be technically possible to use a live traffic feed, or some kind of subscription service with continual, drip-fed updates, to keep things absolutely bang up to date – but that’s a lot of extra work, infrastructure, maintenance, testing, data licensing fees and so on. Forever. There are other downsides too; you need a permanently-on good quality internet connection, not too tricky nowadays but still a consideration. Differences between real-world and simulated airport facilities, which are always going to exist, will be even more obvious. On the other hand, a static database of flights, like Prepar3D uses and TGXP will use, is simple to update periodically (by the developers) and can be changed at will (by the end users) if they really want to. On the plus side, it’s a single unchanging file, so it’s simple. (This is absolutely not true – see below!). On the downside, it’s static. If an airline changes a schedule in the real world then the file doesn’t magically update to match. Another drawback is that the file format that’s being used – at least right now – is identical to the one used by Prepar3D, to let us re-use the existing files and management tools, and this format doesn’t allow for start and end dates. That means that if a particular flight runs only from March to September, there’s no way of dealing with that. That’s a shame, and I’d love to get this feature in. It might – that’s might, as in maybe, maybe not – make it in yet. I’m in control of the traffic database format so it would be very easy to add. It also means more complex preparation of the original data, writing a new and more complex traffic database compiler, and no longer being able to share either the compiled database or the front-end software with the Prepar3D version therefore having to completely re-write that. That’s all time that could be spent making planes do things like fly round corners, or remember to lower their landing gear on approach. So will you be able to stand in the observation gallery of a real-world airport with X-Plane running on your laptop and watch both a physical aircraft and it’s simulated partner taking off at the same time? Actually, yes, in some cases, but – and here’s the thing – that’s not the point. Will the traffic in-sim be as busy on a typical Tuesday as it would for the real airport? Should be, more or less. Depends. Will it feel different on Sundays? Again, should be. We’re aiming to make a given airport feel as busy as it ought to, on a given day of the week and time of day, where possible using real-world flight data from the recent past. If you’re planning on being able to launch X-Plane to check if your wife’s flight landed on time and should you start getting some food ready for when she gets in, there’s probably more appropriate tools out there! It looks like this diary is turning into “The Ugly Truth About Traffic”, so let’s keep going and then never have to touch it again! One of the other comments in that forum thread went along the lines of: “Surely you just download some commercial data, reformat it the way the simulator wants, and ship it? A few hours’ work at most. How hard can it be?” Well, that’s genuinely a very good question, so let’s find out. (Spoiler warning: you might want to get a stiff drink at this point!) First up, the real world usually differs from the simulated one. More specifically, airports can come and go, or change their four-letter ICAO identification codes, meaning that the downloaded flight data might not match the world that the simulator knows about. Even more specifically than that, parking availability is often different. Very different. If a real-world airport can handle 50 planes at once while it’s simulated version can only handle 40, that’s potentially 10 flights at any given moment that can’t happen, and that could be hundreds over the course of a single day. Those flights would all at some point fly to and from other airports, so even if those airports can handle the number of arriving planes, they still won’t be arriving. It’s not just how much parking that’s the issue here, it’s also the type of parking. Different types of aircraft need different grades of parking slot, so if the simulated airport has the full 50 slots but they’re graded too small, that’s another difference that needs to be worked out. Usually simulated airports are short of parking compared to their real-world equivalents. Many airlines also pay for reserved parking at given airports, excluding all other airlines, so this also needs to be checked. Some parking slots are so close to others that only one of them can be used at a time; sometimes they’re called something like “257L” and “257R”, but sometimes not so it’s not a reliable way of checking. What else needs to match? Well, the next most obvious thing is the aircraft. Each commercial flight record will have an aircraft type, so we need to make sure that that type is available in the simulator, with the correct livery for the right airline. That means it needs to be cross-referenced with a list of every airline in the world and every commercially-used aircraft in the world, and each combination of these cross-referenced with the types that are provided with the traffic package, to see which routes we can use. We might also want to look for alternatives; if there’s no specific livery for a Garuda B737-8, what’s the nearest equivalent that we do have? Oh, and remember to check that the replacement aircraft type can fit into the same parking slot size! And what if we don’t have anything for Garuda? What’s the most appropriate airline to use instead? Or should we just use unpainted aircraft? Or maybe drop the flights? Getting a little trickier now, right? Take a deep breath and read on! Next up are schedule changes. The commercial flight database will cover a period of time, and during that period, flights might change. So, you could end up with flight AB1234 leaving an airport at 10:05 on a Tuesday and 10:15 on the same Tuesday if you’re not paying close attention to dates. It might also change routes, or aircraft types, or day of the week, or any combination of these, so we need to look out for these changes and decide which version of the flight to use. “All of them, just in case” isn’t really a useful option because that takes up extra parking slots, which we already know are in high demand. Finally, we have the small problem that the commercial flight database is a list of flights, while what we need are routes. Prepar3D and TGXP both work on the principle that planes shouldn’t ever just pop into existence at a gate and then pop out of existence again after landing. It makes sense if you think about it; how many airlines buy a new plane, load it with passengers and fly it to the destination, then scrap it? If you have a plane that flies from A to B, at some point you want it back at A again ready to run the same flight the next day. This means that the simulator expects to be given a list of routes, where a plane leaves airport A, goes some other places, and ends up back at A again. It also wants to be told how often the route starts, ranging from two hours up to eight weeks. And don’t forget that the plane needs a parking slot for all the time it’s not in the air after the route finishes, while it’s waiting for it to start again.This one plane is the end result of a lot of fiddling So, where are we now? We have a list of around 200,000 flights. Some are almost-but-not-quite duplicates, so these need to be found and we need to decide which version to use. Some fly to airports that might have different IDs, or just not exist at all, in the simulator. The flight times, which are all in local time, need to be converted to UTC time which means getting accurate timezone and daylight savings data for every airport that’s used. Some flights will use aircraft, airlines or combinations of them that don’t exist in the simulator and need to be mapped onto something else. We need to work out which of these flights represent a single aircraft landing at multiple airports before it reaches it’s final destination, and split these multi-hop flights down into individual stages. Most importantly, we need to work out where each plane goes after it has landed, guessing at which flight out of the destination airport represents that plane getting back to it’s starting point. It might be going via somewhere else - or several somewhere elses - first, and there might have been more than one version of any stage of the flight. We might need to take several stabs at this if another plane ends up “stranded” with no outgoing flight. Since the sim’s airports and parking are usually different to real ones, some flights won’t fit into the airports when they land, so we need to work out what parking is available in the sim, and of what size, at each one of the sim’s 40-odd thousand airports, and track what planes of what sizes want to park there at all times regardless of whether they’re flying on a two-hourly cycle or a two-monthly one, remembering to check to see if using one parking slot blocks others nearby. Then we need to selectively drop flights that won’t fit, and just to be nice, see if any that used to not fit now do fit, because one of the dropped flights is now not landing at the airport that originally blocked the other blocked flight. I genuinely don’t know if code-share flights are in there too. I haven’t dared look. And then there’s the question of each end-user having add-on airports with different parking availability. So, to return to the original question: Can preparing the traffic database possibly be any more complicated than hitting “Save As…” in Excel? Well, yes. Yes, it can. Next month, you’ll be relieved to hear, I’ll probably be covering something far, far simpler – how to get all these flights into the sim without slowing it down.Dev Diary for Traffic Global XP – February Welcome back! Last month if you recall, we found out that X-Plane makes it rather harder to add AI traffic than Prepar3D and briefly talked about the two different areas that will need to be covered – providing the routes and models, and getting the sim to use them. For one of those two areas I’m lucky. There’s already another package well under way which provides both a traffic database and hundreds of aircraft models, Traffic Global for Prepar3D. There’s a catch though, in that this is for Prepar3D (and FSX and FSW). Those three simulators are very closely related and can to a large extent share data. X-Plane is a completely different beast though, so is any of this any use after all? Happily, yes, it is! Let’s take the traffic data first. A flight is a flight is a flight. It leaves somewhere then flies to somewhere else at a given time on a given day. Well, unless you’re flying with… no, let’s not go there! Precisely how that information is recorded really doesn’t matter and since X-Plane doesn’t have a flight database format of its own, why not just have it read the Prepar3D data directly? Yup, you read that right, X-Plane will be reading a Prepar3D BGL file.The P3D Traffic Global routes Anyone at the back of the room spluttering about cross-contamination, think about it for a second. Why invent a totally new file to do something that’s already done perfectly well elsewhere? Let’s say I did invent a new file format. I’d still need to write a converter or compiler to go from the base flight schedule data to this new format, so it makes sense to just keep using the existing tools and file formats. In fact there are a couple of catches, namely macOS and Linux, but I’ll get back to those later. It helps that I already know the formats from years of writing other tools to read them, and more recently working with traffic and AI on Flight Sim World, but even without that it would still save a lot of time. Okay, okay, and I admit I just like the idea of making X-Plane read BGLs! What about the models though? It’s not going to look great having hundreds of stock B737s lined up at the gates. X-Plane does, naturally, already have a well-defined file format for models and, equally naturally, it’s totally different to Prepar3D’s format. Option one is to rebuild them from scratch. Not really the most efficient approach, even if it’s just going back to the 3D modelling software and re-exporting. In reality it’s more involved than that anyway. Another option would be to buy the rights to pre-existing models and then do thousands of repaints, but this would still take a huge amount of time as well as being expensive. Again, certainly possible, but not ideal. Using pre-existing flyable airliners is also not ideal because they tend to be much, much more complex models than you want for computer-controlled planes that might exist in their hundreds. So how about converting the existing, specially-created low detail Prepar3D ones? A lengthy sniff around the web doesn’t come up with a converter tool. There’s one for taking an X-Plane model and converting it for Prepar3D, but not the other way round. Annoying – but if it’s possible one way then it’s usually possible the other way too. So, that’s what’s been done! X-Plane will be loading a Prepar3D traffic database and converted Prepar3D models.X-Plane 11 screenshots, but Prepar3D models - every single one After defeating some slightly bizarre application of maths in certain animations, it’s working nicely. All of the Prepar3D models have been converted and animate correctly in X-Plane. There’s a few rough edges yet but they’ll get smoothed off between now and release. More importantly, as improvements are made to Traffic Global for Prepar3D, those exact same improvements will be picked up for X-Plane with minimal effort; no re-working, no duplication of effort, just a batch conversion. When I say “just” a batch conversion, I’m glossing over the whole subject of actually writing the converter! This was several weeks’ work in itself and, even so, still needs a few details to be completed. Reading the Prepar3D models is fine, I’d already got code to do that as part of some of my older tools. Writing out a basic, non-animated model that X-Plane’s “Object Previewer” could read was fairly simple too, Laminar Research are generally very good with documenting things. The tricky bit was getting the animations, effects and lighting right. Remember, these are external models only, we’re not trying to map a load of cockpit switches automatically, but there are still a lot of moving parts that expect to receive Prepar3D data. Take something simple like rudder deflection. Prepar3D models might be set up to receive this based on a value between -1 and 1 for full left to full right, or -100 and 100, or an actual angle which might be in either radians, grads or degrees, while X-Plane might only provide rudder deflection as a percentage. Prepar3D even supports basic arithmetic and logic in animations, which X-Plane doesn’t, and all of these options need to be handled for dozens of moving parts across hundreds of models. The goal, of course, is to have all this complexity made invisible in the finished package. If you’ve just bought a traffic add-on and you need to spend the first three hours downloading models from here, paintjobs from there, customising look-up tables, manually copying files and editing configs and running conversions and so on, it’s going to be a bit of a let-down, right? That’s why, as a developer, it’s nice to write about the bits that are usually hidden. The idea is to get everything working smoothly, to make it appear effortless, but the fun and satisfaction of actually doing the programming in the first place is in getting all the conflicting, complex parts to mesh. It’s like the old image of the swan, serenely gliding along on the surface and totally hiding the furious paddling going on underneath. If you were to look in X-Plane right now, you might think there’s not much progress to see. You’d be right in a way; there has been progress, but very little of it is visible. It’s often the way in larger projects though; there are a lot of separate things that need to be put in place, each of which depends on something that isn’t quite done yet before it can start doing its thing. You might not be able to see much – the swan’s not moving and the feet are just beginning to twitch - but the foundations are being laid.EasyJet PeasyJetDev Diary for Traffic Global XP – January So where did this all come from? Seems like a good place to start. For the last couple of years I’d been doing contract work for Dovetail Games on Flight Sim World, mainly on the missions side – they licensed my FSX Mission Editor and commissioned a load of updates both to that and the sim’s mission system – but eventually also in lots of other parts of the sim. Sadly Dovetail stopped work on that in early 2018 as I’m sure you know, and I was looking out for something else to fill the gap. Enter the nice people at Just Flight who said they had something in mind. Yep, Traffic Global for X-Plane.Where is everybody? As it happens, one of the areas I’d worked on for Dovetail FSW was traffic, adding a lot more GA flights to smaller airfields, so I had a good idea how that side of things worked. Short version: a list of flights comes from a file, matching planes come from other files, these in turn are matched against airports and parking availability and as if by magic, you get planes flying planned routes in the sim. Of course, anyone who’s seen The Wizard of Oz knows that “magic” depends on somebody in the background doing a damn fine impression of a drug-crazed tapdancing octopus trying to get all the levers to be pulled at the right time. For a traffic add-on there are in fact two tapdancing octopi: one preparing all the data, and another using it. Just preparing the data – making sure that all the flights work properly, pairing with a simulated world that doesn’t match the real one, providing all the necessary models – is an enormous task. The other octopus, at least for Prepar3D/FSX/FSW (I’m going to use these interchangeably), is provided by the simulator. Feed it the right data, it’ll fly the planes around. Not so for X-Plane. It used to be the case that X-Plane would move planes around for you to some extent if you controlled their autopilot settings. That’s fine for going from A to B, but what about landing? Taxying to parking? Circuit patterns? As it happens, none of that was relevant because this whole facility was removed some time ago. Righto. Can I just feed it some kind of traffic database, like P3D uses? Nope. Oh, and X-Plane only supports a maximum of 20 non-player planes too, even if the autopilot trick still worked, which it doesn’t. If this sounds like I’m beating up X-Plane, bear with me, I’m not! Those 20 planes that can be controlled from outside the sim are really meant for multiplayer rather than AI traffic, so in fact both the small number and the removal of the autopilot kind of makes sense. It does leave you with only one option though: you can have any number of planes added to the sim using a different approach if you control them yourself. Entirely yourself. 60 times a second, you need to tell X-Plane where your planes are, how they’re oriented and animated. For potentially hundreds of planes in the player’s local area from tens of thousands around the world.Ah - that's better! Okay then. This is going to take some planning. SOURCE INFO Just Flight - Developer's diary - Traffic Global for X-Plane 11 WWW.JUSTFLIGHT.COM Explore over 400 add-ons for Flight Simulator on the new Just Flight website. We are proud of our position as the world’s largest publisher of flight simulation software for home PC users, developing and publishing the highest quality software since 1995. DEVELOPER POST LINK : Just Flight - Developer's diary - Traffic Global for X-Plane 11 WWW.JUSTFLIGHT.COM Explore over 400 add-ons for Flight Simulator on the new Just Flight website. We are proud of our position as the world’s largest publisher of flight simulation software for home PC users, developing and publishing the highest quality software since 1995. NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK : Just Flight - Developer's diary - Traffic Global for X-Plane 11 WWW.JUSTFLIGHT.COM Explore over 400 add-ons for Flight Simulator on the new Just Flight website. We are proud of our position as the world’s largest publisher of flight simulation software for home PC users, developing and publishing the highest quality software since 1995.
  19. This is an exclusive short-clip extracted from our full FREE Dassault Falcon 7X ULTIMATE COCKPIT MOVIE available here starting 25th May 2019, 8pm CET: https://youtu.be/qi_IF0PVl70. These extracted short clips show you takeoff and landing sequences from a variation of different camera angles, so that you can enjoy every aspect of it! The AirClips Team was granted exclusive access to one of the most closed and restricted areas of commercial aviation: We were allowed to join a longhaul private jet flight on a super-modern three-engined Dassault Falcon 7X business jet from Sao Paulo Guarulhos airport in Brazil to Belfast in Northern Ireland. An amazing 11.5 hour journey in which we were allowed to meet the stunning Air Hamburg Crew, indulge in fantastic views on and out of the fence TriStar-shaped 7X and also to enjoy the unique "Simply Personal" VIP service concept. Now lean back and enjoy a once-in-a-lifetime intercontinental journey in the world's last three-holer passenger jet in production (coming sister-model 8X as the same)! The Dassault Falcon 7X is a large-cabin, 5,950 nmi range business jet manufactured by Dassault Aviation, the 2nd largest of its Dassault Falcon line. Launched at 2001 Paris Air Show, its first flight was on 5 May 2005 and it entered service on 15 June 2007. The Falcon 8X is derived from the 7X with a longer range of 6,450 nmi afforded by engine optimizing, aerodynamic refinements and an increase in fuel capacity.[7] Featuring an S-duct central engine, it and the Falcon 900 are the only two trijets in production. Dassault launched the FNX at the 2001 Paris Air Show, aiming for a 10,500km (5,700nm) range at Mach 0.88 up from the Falcon 900EX 8,300km at Mach 0.84. Its new high-speed wing is 1.86m (6.10ft) longer with 5° higher wing sweep than the 900 wing, while its 20% longer fuselage is keeps the same cabin cross-section but with a new curved windscreen. The trijet has a combined thrust of 18,000lb (80kN) provided by Honeywell FX5s, a new design, or a Pratt & Whitney Canada PW306 growth version. Based on Honeywell Primus Epic avionics, its EASy cockpit is developed for the Falcon 2000EX and 900EX and controls are fly-by-wire. Scheduled to fly in 2004, first deliveries were planned for mid-2006. With 41 deposits, it was named 7X in November with first flight slipping from late 2004 to early 2005 and certification planned for mid-2006. With a simplified structure to reduce cost and weight, the optimised high-transonic wing improves by more than 10% the lift-to-drag ratio over the supercritical-section wing of the Falcon 50 shared by previous Falcons. The cabin is 2.4m (8ft) longer than the 900 and have a lower 6,000ft (1,800m) cabin altitude. the 6,100lb-thrust (21.7kN) PW307A was finally selected, among other risk-sharing partners: Honeywell for avionics architecture, auxiliary power unit, air management system; with Parker Hannifin for the power generation system and wheels brakes; and TRW Aeronautical Systems for the hydromechanical flap and airbrake systems. With over 50 firm orders, it completed its first flight on 5 May in 1h 36min from Bordeaux-Merignac, starting a 1,200h flight test programme over 15 month: it climbed to 10,000ft (3,000m) for hydraulic, fuel, air data and landing gear extraction/retraction systems tests, then climbed to 25,000ft for acceleration/deceleration tests and basic autopilot and autothrottle operations. The second Falcon 7X should join in June, and the third with a full interior in September for long-range, endurance tests and interior sound level validation: Dassault aims for a 52dB sound level in the cabin, 4dB lower than other Falcons. Certification slipped to late 2006 and first deliveries to early 2007. It was first presented to the public at the 2005 Paris Air Show. The aircraft has received its type certification from both the Federal Aviation Administration and European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) on 27 April 2007. The first 7X, MSN05, entered service on 15 June 2007. The hundredth was delivered in November 2010. It conducted high altitude airport tests at 14,500 ft in Daocheng in 2014. The Falcon 7X is a three-engined cantilever monoplane with a low-positioned, highly swept wing. It has a horizontal stabiliser at mid-height and a retractable tricycle landing gear, and three rear-mounted Pratt & Whitney PW307A turbofan engines : two on the side of the fuselage and one in a center position, and room for 20 passengers and two crew. It is the first production Falcon jet to offer winglets. It is the first fully fly-by-wire business jet and is equipped with the same avionics suite, the Honeywell Primus Epic "Enhanced Avionics System" (EASy), that was used on the Falcon 900EX and later on the Falcon 2000EX. The Falcon 7X is notable for its extensive use of computer-aided design, the manufacturer claiming it to be the "first aircraft to be designed entirely on a virtual platform", using Dassault Systemes' CATIA and PLM products.SOURCE
  20. World's biggest airplane takes flight for first time over Mojave desert SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK :
  21. So beautiful, but as everyone dives in with addons for features not implemented at the core level by the sim, lots of disconnects will become apparent.
  22. Last year, Tom Scott put on his twitter that he was looking for video ideas in Vancouver. I tried messaging him there with no success. Suddenly I got an email from Tom on my gmail that he heard I was the guy to see in Vancouver. So, we did this together. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y27lFsPEZ30 While he was in Vancouver, he suddenly realized he had been here before, but as a kid playing a video game called "Need For Speed 2". He talked about wanting to do a video on the game which he recently released. It was super cool, and on our flight, he was still trying to figure out a script. I thought people might like to get a bit of a behind the scene look at Tom and his video. Hope you enjoy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=juRkaqkDfCM Big thanks to Devin Olsen for filming and editing and refusing to be fired... https://www.instagram.com/devinolsen/?hl=en Also a HUGE thanks to everyone who bought my tooth brush after the last video! Really incredible to have your support like that! It's a product I'm really happy about and think gives a lot of value. If you ordered and received it, please let me know your thoughts in the comments! http://www.bruush.com and use Promo Code "smile20" for 20% off your order. https://www.instagram.com/bruush/ Also! My other new product, Last Call is finally available on Amazon. It doesn't ship to Canada yet because of Health Canada regulations. But, we received that approval after 3 years in the application stage last week, so the Canadian version is coming soon! http://www.lastcallbeverage.com https://www.instagram.com/lastcallbeverage/?hl=en https://www.amazon.com/Last-Call-Recovery-Hangover-Prevention/dp/B07P7RZNLZ/ref=sr_1_1?m=A3UR8G49ZVYIL4&amp ;amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&qid=1555613558&s=merchant-items&sr=1-1&th=1SOURCE
  23. After only revealing the aircraft a few short weeks ago, Carenado has released their anticipated A42 500 Series for FSX and Prepar3D. The included aircraft is the ATR 42-500. The aircraft itself saw its maiden flight in 1981 and has since seen over 1800 of the type built. With a typical seating layout for 48 passengers and a maximum range of 716nm, it’s a great aircraft for domestic travel. The aircraft from Carenado features full PBR textures and materials for Prepar3D V4.4 and above, an updatable database from Navigraph, rea; start-up procedures and sounds recorded from the ATR 42-600. In addition, the aircraft features 4K texturing, realistic behaviour for weight and balance and also detailed night lighting. The aircraft is available through Carenado’s website for $44.95 (Excl. VAT). Features Full FSX, FSX-STEAM, P3D v3, v4, v4.4 (and up) compatible. Full PBR textures and materials (Physically Based Rendering ) (P3D v4.4 and up). Flight1 GTN 750 and Reality XP GTN 750* integration Updatable database – AIRAC cycle 1601 (January 2016) included.** VR ready. Real start up procedures. Real A42 engine sounds, aural warnings and sound systems. Real flight dynamics. Cold and Dark start option. Takeoff run and landing real rolling movement effect. Custom brakes sounds on taxi and landing run. Original autopilot installed. HD quality textures (4096 x 4096). Customizable panel for controlling windows transparency, instrument reflections and static elements such as wheel chocks. Real behavior compared to the real airplane. Real weight and balance. Tested by real pilots. Realistic night lights effects on panel and cockpit. SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK : Carenado A42-500 Series Released for FSX & Prepar3D | FSElite FSELITE.NET After only revealing the aircraft a few short weeks ago, Carenado has released their anticipated A42 500 Series for FSX and Prepar3D. The included aircraft is the ATR 42-500. The aircraft itself saw its maiden flight in 1981 and has since seen over 1800 of the type built. With a typical seating layout for 48 […]
  24. Another bizarre event in the world of aviation ... Virgin Australia crew discovers owl hidden in the aircraft's engine - Aviation24.be WWW.AVIATION24.BE During a pre-flight check on a Virgin Australia aircraft, an owl was found. The engineers rescued the lovely bird from the engine and released it back into the wild. The airline took to social media to... SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK : https://www.aviation24.be/airlines/virgin-australia/crew-discovers-owl-hidden-in-the-aircrafts-engine/
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