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ssimmons1958

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  1. Orbx-LIEO Olbia Costa Smeralda Airport-Update v1.05 Go to FTX Central To Get It SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK :
  2. bet their just buzy dealing with other more pressing stuff
  3. New RealTimeFlight Manager Program released Dear Stephen Simmons, New 'RealTimeFlight Manager' program released. This program helps flight simulator users to start their flights in real world’s current local time in any airports around the world. It is not matter where you live or what your system time is, this program sets correct local time in airport you start your flight. For more information and download visit our website (simelite.com), on top menu, open Products, then click on 'RealTimeFlight Manager' Best Regards, SimElite Solutions Admin SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK :
  4. First TrueEarth USA Sneak Peek! ✈ Our cutting edge TrueEarth technology is coming to the land of the free! TrueEarth USA Washington This sneak peek really shows off the diversity of this amazing new region. Make sure to join our forums and keep an eye on our Facebook and Twitter pages for the fully detailed announcement coming up next week! 100% PBR Airport Coming Soon! Last week, JV teased the above images which have come from an upcoming airport project for X-Plane 11 and Prepar3D v4. We are working in tandem with the Turbulent team in order to bring you this new tech, and new workflows mean that we can release the P3D and XP versions very close together if not at the same time! This airport is our first to be built using 100% compliance to the correct PBR standards for all materials. If you look at the shots, you can see that the detail isn't just on the ground services equipment but also on the apron on which they sit. The incredible level of detail on the baggage lifter does not mean it is an FPS hog. The original model was made up of over 24 million polygons and that model was used to create the PBR map for a lower poly target. This means you get an amazingly detailed airport without the high-poly penalty.  Likewise, with the entire airport being PBR, the apron reflects light based on each material used such as asphalt, paint, metal grates and puddles etc. The lighting changes depending on the time of day, level of cloud cover, rain etc. Just don't ask us which airport it is, because we're not confirming anything yet! READ THE FULL FORUM POST HERE Copyright © 2018 Orbx Simulation Systems Pty Ltd, All rights reserved. Orbx Simulation Systems, PO Box 312 Toowong, Queensland 4066 Australia unsubscribe from this list update subscription preferences ReplyForward SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK :
  5. tried link got-404 - Page could not be found searched around found here- Global Earth STORE.X-PLANE.ORG for Your Price:$45.00
  6. Developer's diary - Traffic Global for X-Plane 11 by Jim Keir (Developer) Hello! Welcome to the dev diary for Traffic Global for X-Plane – TGXP to friends. I’m going to be talking about how this came about, what it does, what it doesn’t do, why, and quite a lot of what goes into making it work. There’s going to be a certain amount of techy background detail – hey, it’s a dev diary – but I want this to be open to anyone with a little interest in what goes into making your sim a nicer place to be.January / February / MarchDev Diary for Traffic Global XP – March Welcome back! After dealing with providing aircraft models and the actual traffic database – at least partly – last month, it’s time to take a step back and look at some of the design choices that were made, and why. The big question of course is “what are we trying to achieve?”. Well… traffic. In the sim. Speaking as a real-life (if very occasional) pilot who flies near London I’d love nothing more than to remove a great deal of traffic! However, there’s no question that in-sim there are far fewer other aircraft around and if you’re going for “as real as it gets”, that’s a problem. So, once again, what are we aiming for? You might say “as real as it gets but c’mon guys it’s a simulator”. I was reading a forum thread the other night about a completely different traffic product which had a long sequence of posts along the lines of “… yeah, but my local airport, Hicksville Muni, added three parking spots on the grass last week and does this product that was released 18 months ago use them? Does it heck. What a waste of money.”Sim Heathrow - not quite the same as the real Heathrow One of the earliest design choices to be made was how dynamic the traffic would be. In other words, it would be technically possible to use a live traffic feed, or some kind of subscription service with continual, drip-fed updates, to keep things absolutely bang up to date – but that’s a lot of extra work, infrastructure, maintenance, testing, data licensing fees and so on. Forever. There are other downsides too; you need a permanently-on good quality internet connection, not too tricky nowadays but still a consideration. Differences between real-world and simulated airport facilities, which are always going to exist, will be even more obvious. On the other hand, a static database of flights, like Prepar3D uses and TGXP will use, is simple to update periodically (by the developers) and can be changed at will (by the end users) if they really want to. On the plus side, it’s a single unchanging file, so it’s simple. (This is absolutely not true – see below!). On the downside, it’s static. If an airline changes a schedule in the real world then the file doesn’t magically update to match. Another drawback is that the file format that’s being used – at least right now – is identical to the one used by Prepar3D, to let us re-use the existing files and management tools, and this format doesn’t allow for start and end dates. That means that if a particular flight runs only from March to September, there’s no way of dealing with that. That’s a shame, and I’d love to get this feature in. It might – that’s might, as in maybe, maybe not – make it in yet. I’m in control of the traffic database format so it would be very easy to add. It also means more complex preparation of the original data, writing a new and more complex traffic database compiler, and no longer being able to share either the compiled database or the front-end software with the Prepar3D version therefore having to completely re-write that. That’s all time that could be spent making planes do things like fly round corners, or remember to lower their landing gear on approach. So will you be able to stand in the observation gallery of a real-world airport with X-Plane running on your laptop and watch both a physical aircraft and it’s simulated partner taking off at the same time? Actually, yes, in some cases, but – and here’s the thing – that’s not the point. Will the traffic in-sim be as busy on a typical Tuesday as it would for the real airport? Should be, more or less. Depends. Will it feel different on Sundays? Again, should be. We’re aiming to make a given airport feel as busy as it ought to, on a given day of the week and time of day, where possible using real-world flight data from the recent past. If you’re planning on being able to launch X-Plane to check if your wife’s flight landed on time and should you start getting some food ready for when she gets in, there’s probably more appropriate tools out there! It looks like this diary is turning into “The Ugly Truth About Traffic”, so let’s keep going and then never have to touch it again! One of the other comments in that forum thread went along the lines of: “Surely you just download some commercial data, reformat it the way the simulator wants, and ship it? A few hours’ work at most. How hard can it be?” Well, that’s genuinely a very good question, so let’s find out. (Spoiler warning: you might want to get a stiff drink at this point!) First up, the real world usually differs from the simulated one. More specifically, airports can come and go, or change their four-letter ICAO identification codes, meaning that the downloaded flight data might not match the world that the simulator knows about. Even more specifically than that, parking availability is often different. Very different. If a real-world airport can handle 50 planes at once while it’s simulated version can only handle 40, that’s potentially 10 flights at any given moment that can’t happen, and that could be hundreds over the course of a single day. Those flights would all at some point fly to and from other airports, so even if those airports can handle the number of arriving planes, they still won’t be arriving. It’s not just how much parking that’s the issue here, it’s also the type of parking. Different types of aircraft need different grades of parking slot, so if the simulated airport has the full 50 slots but they’re graded too small, that’s another difference that needs to be worked out. Usually simulated airports are short of parking compared to their real-world equivalents. Many airlines also pay for reserved parking at given airports, excluding all other airlines, so this also needs to be checked. Some parking slots are so close to others that only one of them can be used at a time; sometimes they’re called something like “257L” and “257R”, but sometimes not so it’s not a reliable way of checking. What else needs to match? Well, the next most obvious thing is the aircraft. Each commercial flight record will have an aircraft type, so we need to make sure that that type is available in the simulator, with the correct livery for the right airline. That means it needs to be cross-referenced with a list of every airline in the world and every commercially-used aircraft in the world, and each combination of these cross-referenced with the types that are provided with the traffic package, to see which routes we can use. We might also want to look for alternatives; if there’s no specific livery for a Garuda B737-8, what’s the nearest equivalent that we do have? Oh, and remember to check that the replacement aircraft type can fit into the same parking slot size! And what if we don’t have anything for Garuda? What’s the most appropriate airline to use instead? Or should we just use unpainted aircraft? Or maybe drop the flights? Getting a little trickier now, right? Take a deep breath and read on! Next up are schedule changes. The commercial flight database will cover a period of time, and during that period, flights might change. So, you could end up with flight AB1234 leaving an airport at 10:05 on a Tuesday and 10:15 on the same Tuesday if you’re not paying close attention to dates. It might also change routes, or aircraft types, or day of the week, or any combination of these, so we need to look out for these changes and decide which version of the flight to use. “All of them, just in case” isn’t really a useful option because that takes up extra parking slots, which we already know are in high demand. Finally, we have the small problem that the commercial flight database is a list of flights, while what we need are routes. Prepar3D and TGXP both work on the principle that planes shouldn’t ever just pop into existence at a gate and then pop out of existence again after landing. It makes sense if you think about it; how many airlines buy a new plane, load it with passengers and fly it to the destination, then scrap it? If you have a plane that flies from A to B, at some point you want it back at A again ready to run the same flight the next day. This means that the simulator expects to be given a list of routes, where a plane leaves airport A, goes some other places, and ends up back at A again. It also wants to be told how often the route starts, ranging from two hours up to eight weeks. And don’t forget that the plane needs a parking slot for all the time it’s not in the air after the route finishes, while it’s waiting for it to start again.This one plane is the end result of a lot of fiddling So, where are we now? We have a list of around 200,000 flights. Some are almost-but-not-quite duplicates, so these need to be found and we need to decide which version to use. Some fly to airports that might have different IDs, or just not exist at all, in the simulator. The flight times, which are all in local time, need to be converted to UTC time which means getting accurate timezone and daylight savings data for every airport that’s used. Some flights will use aircraft, airlines or combinations of them that don’t exist in the simulator and need to be mapped onto something else. We need to work out which of these flights represent a single aircraft landing at multiple airports before it reaches it’s final destination, and split these multi-hop flights down into individual stages. Most importantly, we need to work out where each plane goes after it has landed, guessing at which flight out of the destination airport represents that plane getting back to it’s starting point. It might be going via somewhere else - or several somewhere elses - first, and there might have been more than one version of any stage of the flight. We might need to take several stabs at this if another plane ends up “stranded” with no outgoing flight. Since the sim’s airports and parking are usually different to real ones, some flights won’t fit into the airports when they land, so we need to work out what parking is available in the sim, and of what size, at each one of the sim’s 40-odd thousand airports, and track what planes of what sizes want to park there at all times regardless of whether they’re flying on a two-hourly cycle or a two-monthly one, remembering to check to see if using one parking slot blocks others nearby. Then we need to selectively drop flights that won’t fit, and just to be nice, see if any that used to not fit now do fit, because one of the dropped flights is now not landing at the airport that originally blocked the other blocked flight. I genuinely don’t know if code-share flights are in there too. I haven’t dared look. And then there’s the question of each end-user having add-on airports with different parking availability. So, to return to the original question: Can preparing the traffic database possibly be any more complicated than hitting “Save As…” in Excel? Well, yes. Yes, it can. Next month, you’ll be relieved to hear, I’ll probably be covering something far, far simpler – how to get all these flights into the sim without slowing it down.Dev Diary for Traffic Global XP – February Welcome back! Last month if you recall, we found out that X-Plane makes it rather harder to add AI traffic than Prepar3D and briefly talked about the two different areas that will need to be covered – providing the routes and models, and getting the sim to use them. For one of those two areas I’m lucky. There’s already another package well under way which provides both a traffic database and hundreds of aircraft models, Traffic Global for Prepar3D. There’s a catch though, in that this is for Prepar3D (and FSX and FSW). Those three simulators are very closely related and can to a large extent share data. X-Plane is a completely different beast though, so is any of this any use after all? Happily, yes, it is! Let’s take the traffic data first. A flight is a flight is a flight. It leaves somewhere then flies to somewhere else at a given time on a given day. Well, unless you’re flying with… no, let’s not go there! Precisely how that information is recorded really doesn’t matter and since X-Plane doesn’t have a flight database format of its own, why not just have it read the Prepar3D data directly? Yup, you read that right, X-Plane will be reading a Prepar3D BGL file.The P3D Traffic Global routes Anyone at the back of the room spluttering about cross-contamination, think about it for a second. Why invent a totally new file to do something that’s already done perfectly well elsewhere? Let’s say I did invent a new file format. I’d still need to write a converter or compiler to go from the base flight schedule data to this new format, so it makes sense to just keep using the existing tools and file formats. In fact there are a couple of catches, namely macOS and Linux, but I’ll get back to those later. It helps that I already know the formats from years of writing other tools to read them, and more recently working with traffic and AI on Flight Sim World, but even without that it would still save a lot of time. Okay, okay, and I admit I just like the idea of making X-Plane read BGLs! What about the models though? It’s not going to look great having hundreds of stock B737s lined up at the gates. X-Plane does, naturally, already have a well-defined file format for models and, equally naturally, it’s totally different to Prepar3D’s format. Option one is to rebuild them from scratch. Not really the most efficient approach, even if it’s just going back to the 3D modelling software and re-exporting. In reality it’s more involved than that anyway. Another option would be to buy the rights to pre-existing models and then do thousands of repaints, but this would still take a huge amount of time as well as being expensive. Again, certainly possible, but not ideal. Using pre-existing flyable airliners is also not ideal because they tend to be much, much more complex models than you want for computer-controlled planes that might exist in their hundreds. So how about converting the existing, specially-created low detail Prepar3D ones? A lengthy sniff around the web doesn’t come up with a converter tool. There’s one for taking an X-Plane model and converting it for Prepar3D, but not the other way round. Annoying – but if it’s possible one way then it’s usually possible the other way too. So, that’s what’s been done! X-Plane will be loading a Prepar3D traffic database and converted Prepar3D models.X-Plane 11 screenshots, but Prepar3D models - every single one After defeating some slightly bizarre application of maths in certain animations, it’s working nicely. All of the Prepar3D models have been converted and animate correctly in X-Plane. There’s a few rough edges yet but they’ll get smoothed off between now and release. More importantly, as improvements are made to Traffic Global for Prepar3D, those exact same improvements will be picked up for X-Plane with minimal effort; no re-working, no duplication of effort, just a batch conversion. When I say “just” a batch conversion, I’m glossing over the whole subject of actually writing the converter! This was several weeks’ work in itself and, even so, still needs a few details to be completed. Reading the Prepar3D models is fine, I’d already got code to do that as part of some of my older tools. Writing out a basic, non-animated model that X-Plane’s “Object Previewer” could read was fairly simple too, Laminar Research are generally very good with documenting things. The tricky bit was getting the animations, effects and lighting right. Remember, these are external models only, we’re not trying to map a load of cockpit switches automatically, but there are still a lot of moving parts that expect to receive Prepar3D data. Take something simple like rudder deflection. Prepar3D models might be set up to receive this based on a value between -1 and 1 for full left to full right, or -100 and 100, or an actual angle which might be in either radians, grads or degrees, while X-Plane might only provide rudder deflection as a percentage. Prepar3D even supports basic arithmetic and logic in animations, which X-Plane doesn’t, and all of these options need to be handled for dozens of moving parts across hundreds of models. The goal, of course, is to have all this complexity made invisible in the finished package. If you’ve just bought a traffic add-on and you need to spend the first three hours downloading models from here, paintjobs from there, customising look-up tables, manually copying files and editing configs and running conversions and so on, it’s going to be a bit of a let-down, right? That’s why, as a developer, it’s nice to write about the bits that are usually hidden. The idea is to get everything working smoothly, to make it appear effortless, but the fun and satisfaction of actually doing the programming in the first place is in getting all the conflicting, complex parts to mesh. It’s like the old image of the swan, serenely gliding along on the surface and totally hiding the furious paddling going on underneath. If you were to look in X-Plane right now, you might think there’s not much progress to see. You’d be right in a way; there has been progress, but very little of it is visible. It’s often the way in larger projects though; there are a lot of separate things that need to be put in place, each of which depends on something that isn’t quite done yet before it can start doing its thing. You might not be able to see much – the swan’s not moving and the feet are just beginning to twitch - but the foundations are being laid.EasyJet PeasyJetDev Diary for Traffic Global XP – January So where did this all come from? Seems like a good place to start. For the last couple of years I’d been doing contract work for Dovetail Games on Flight Sim World, mainly on the missions side – they licensed my FSX Mission Editor and commissioned a load of updates both to that and the sim’s mission system – but eventually also in lots of other parts of the sim. Sadly Dovetail stopped work on that in early 2018 as I’m sure you know, and I was looking out for something else to fill the gap. Enter the nice people at Just Flight who said they had something in mind. Yep, Traffic Global for X-Plane.Where is everybody? As it happens, one of the areas I’d worked on for Dovetail FSW was traffic, adding a lot more GA flights to smaller airfields, so I had a good idea how that side of things worked. Short version: a list of flights comes from a file, matching planes come from other files, these in turn are matched against airports and parking availability and as if by magic, you get planes flying planned routes in the sim. Of course, anyone who’s seen The Wizard of Oz knows that “magic” depends on somebody in the background doing a damn fine impression of a drug-crazed tapdancing octopus trying to get all the levers to be pulled at the right time. For a traffic add-on there are in fact two tapdancing octopi: one preparing all the data, and another using it. Just preparing the data – making sure that all the flights work properly, pairing with a simulated world that doesn’t match the real one, providing all the necessary models – is an enormous task. The other octopus, at least for Prepar3D/FSX/FSW (I’m going to use these interchangeably), is provided by the simulator. Feed it the right data, it’ll fly the planes around. Not so for X-Plane. It used to be the case that X-Plane would move planes around for you to some extent if you controlled their autopilot settings. That’s fine for going from A to B, but what about landing? Taxying to parking? Circuit patterns? As it happens, none of that was relevant because this whole facility was removed some time ago. Righto. Can I just feed it some kind of traffic database, like P3D uses? Nope. Oh, and X-Plane only supports a maximum of 20 non-player planes too, even if the autopilot trick still worked, which it doesn’t. If this sounds like I’m beating up X-Plane, bear with me, I’m not! Those 20 planes that can be controlled from outside the sim are really meant for multiplayer rather than AI traffic, so in fact both the small number and the removal of the autopilot kind of makes sense. It does leave you with only one option though: you can have any number of planes added to the sim using a different approach if you control them yourself. Entirely yourself. 60 times a second, you need to tell X-Plane where your planes are, how they’re oriented and animated. For potentially hundreds of planes in the player’s local area from tens of thousands around the world.Ah - that's better! Okay then. This is going to take some planning. SOURCE INFO Just Flight - Developer's diary - Traffic Global for X-Plane 11 WWW.JUSTFLIGHT.COM Explore over 400 add-ons for Flight Simulator on the new Just Flight website. We are proud of our position as the world’s largest publisher of flight simulation software for home PC users, developing and publishing the highest quality software since 1995. DEVELOPER POST LINK : Just Flight - Developer's diary - Traffic Global for X-Plane 11 WWW.JUSTFLIGHT.COM Explore over 400 add-ons for Flight Simulator on the new Just Flight website. We are proud of our position as the world’s largest publisher of flight simulation software for home PC users, developing and publishing the highest quality software since 1995. NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK : Just Flight - Developer's diary - Traffic Global for X-Plane 11 WWW.JUSTFLIGHT.COM Explore over 400 add-ons for Flight Simulator on the new Just Flight website. We are proud of our position as the world’s largest publisher of flight simulation software for home PC users, developing and publishing the highest quality software since 1995.
  7. New from Just Flight - Duchess Model 76 for Aerofly FS 2! Duchess Model 76 for Aerofly FS 2 £27.99 / €34.95 / $41.99 Just Flight's highly detailed and accurately modelled Duchess Model 76 for Aerofly FS 2 comes in five paint schemes and boasts a fully functional IFR-capable avionics fit and Century IV autopilot in the virtual cockpit. The electrical, fuel, hydraulic and engine management systems are all custom-coded and among the other features are numerous accurate animations, HD textures throughout and authentic RPM gauge needle ‘wobble’. See the Just Flight website for more screenshots and all the aircraft details! SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK :
  8. Cessna 310L v1.1.0a Released! Download it now... Hello Stephen, X-Aviation and Digital Replica are pleased to announce the release of the Cessna 310L v1.1.0a update! Read below to see the changes! login! Simply re-download your original download to update! Here's what's changed in version 1.1.0a: What's New / Changed: Fixed librain graphic error. Fixed fuel gagues broken on 1.1.0 implementation. Reworked cockpit view limits. Particles effect adjusted. Adjusted autopilot pitch. As always, thanks for purchasing from X-Aviation! We appreciate your business and look forward to serving you more in the future! Blue Skies, X-Aviation.com Copyright © 2019 X-Aviation, All rights reserved. You are receiving this e-mail as a customer to this product Our mailing address is: X-Aviation P.O. Box 290213 Port Orange, FL 32129 Add us to your address book unsubscribe from this list update subscription preferences SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK :
  9. VC10 Professional - v1.21 Update Dear Sir/Madam, We're writing to let you know that new v1.21 software for our VC10 Professional add-on is now available, providing a number of fixes and the addition of some new call-outs and custom sounds. Please see the VC10 Professional Support page for more details. If you log in to your Just Flight account and click on 'Your Orders', you will be able to re-download the installer to get the latest v1.21 version of the software. Best wishes, The Just Flight Crew You are receiving this email notification because our records show you have a valid order for this product. Click on the Unsubscribe link below to stop receiving Just Flight emails. Please do not reply to this email as it is sent from an unmonitored address. You can contact us via the Just Flight website. SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK :
  10. X-Plane: Cessna 310L 1.1.0 Update Released from X-Aviation Inbox x Cessna 310L v1.1.0 update released! View this email in your browser Cessna 310L v1.1.0 Released! Download it now... Hello Stephen, X-Aviation and Digital Replica are pleased to announce the release of the Cessna 310L v1.1.0 update! Read below to see the changes! Click here and login! Simply re-download your original download to update! Here's what's changed in version 1.1.0: What's New / Changed: Librain effect implemented. De-Ice system implemented. Ice formation visual implementation. Oxygen system implemented. Added an oil pressure switch (not visible) which is connected in series with the auxiliary fuel pump switch. This prevents the fuel pumps from operating (except by the primer switch) if the respective engine is not running. Added an option on the load chart to couple the autopilot with the GPS (users request). Autopilot pitch wheel tuned. Cowl flaps tuned. Now engines won't overheat when fully closed. Landing lights now have smooth animation and a delay from switch up to lights on. Mixture auto-engaging when the starter is engaged fixed. Various 3d and texture fixes. As always, thanks for purchasing from X-Aviation! We appreciate your business and look forward to serving you more in the future! Blue Skies, X-Aviation.com Copyright © 2019 X-Aviation, All rights reserved. You are receiving this e-mail as a customer to this product Our mailing address is: X-Aviation P.O. Box 290213 Port Orange, FL 32129 Add us to your address book unsubscribe from this list update subscription preferences ReplyForward SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK :
  11. read sometime this week or next they will be releasing FULL VERSION UPGRADE FROM 2.09 TO 2.10
  12. New FSTrackers V2.5 released Dear Stephen Simmons, New FSTrackers (Flight Simulator Tracking System) version V2.4 released. After releasing V2.0 to V2.4 of FSTrackers, we received feedbacks from some of our users so we made important changes to solve existing problems. If you tried V2.0 to V2.4 and you had problem tracking your flight or problem loading flight plan into FSTrackers program, please try this new V2.5 There are very important hints you should know them before using FSTrackers system. please read them first Here. If you haven't used FSTrackers before, we encourage you to use it now! You can visit FSTrackers website (fstrackers.com) to download necessary application (download link is at the bottom left section of screen) and start enjoy tracking your flights. If you faced any problem or Error, let us know by sending an email to support@simelite.com. Best Regards, SimElite Solutions Admin SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK :
  13. 100% PBR Airport Coming Soon! Earlier this week, JV teased the above images which have come from an upcoming airport project for X-Plane 11 and Prepar3D v4. We are working in tandem with the Turbulent team in order to bring you this new tech, and new workflows mean that we can release the P3D and XP versions very close together if not at the same time! This airport is our first to be built using 100% compliance to the correct PBR standards for all materials. If you look at the shots, you can see that the detail isn't just on the ground services equipment but also on the apron on which they sit. The incredible level of detail on the baggage lifter does not mean it is an FPS hog. The original model was made up of over 24 million polygons and that model was used to create the PBR map for a lower poly target. This means you get an amazingly detailed airport without the high-poly penalty.  Likewise, with the entire airport being PBR, the apron reflects light based on each material used such as asphalt, paint, metal grates and puddles etc. The lighting changes depending on the time of day, level of cloud cover, rain etc. Just don't ask us which airport it is, because we're not confirming anything yet! READ THE FULL FORUM POST HERE Community member Benny has created this amazing video of Bilbao Airport LEBB Bilbao Airport v1.1 now live The anticipated update for LEBB Bilbao is now available via FTX Central Feature list: New high-res textures for terminal area Completely new high-res ground textures with normal maps SODE gates Approach for runway 12/30 has gotten a massive upgrade with roughly 200 new building types and variations Mountain ranges and wind farms added to Southern approach, making the whole descent a new experience Ambient light effect has been added to the whole city New water puddle effect at the airport, New crisp terrain features at the terminal area Upgraded cargo area New, more realistic AFCAD optimized to be AI-friendly. Various bug fixes Please note FSX change list may vary due to technical & memory limitations. SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK :
  14. UPDATE: TOGA PROJECTS - ENVTEX FSX P3D Dear simMarket Customer, at http://www.simmarket.com you can now find an update of your product: TOGA PROJECTS - ENVTEX FSX P3D Envtex_patch_1.2.2.exe Envtex 1.2.2 is now available. To update your product, please simply click the update button in the Envdir Help page and follow the instructions or download the 1.2.2 patch available in your SimMarket account. Once the patch is installed, please reapply the features into your simulator by clicking "Install to sim" in Envdir. You can also refer to this file available in your SimMarket account: "Envtex - How to download and install.pdf" Please note that the version 1.2.0 (available as the full installer in your SimMarket account) is required before installing this patch. Full changelog: - Compatibility update for Prepar3D v4.5 You will find the link to download the update when you log into your user account --> my orders --> respective order. Should you have any questions please contact us via http://support.simmarket.com For technical support please contact the support addresses listed in the documentation for the respective product. The support addresses are also listed in the respective product description pages in our shop. Best Regards, The simMarket Team ------ simFlight GmbH Werner-von-Siemens-Str. 28 24568 Kaltenkirchen Germany SOURCE INFO DEVELOPER POST LINK : NEWS SITE ARTICLE LINK :
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